Javelina Restaurant

javelina-restaurant

This 1,600 sf restaurant interior draws inspiration from the fusion of traditional Mexican design elements, such as encaustic tile and geometric patterning, with qualities of the sparse & arid landscape of southwest Texas. A neutral, earth-toned palette of natural materials is punctuated by the application of vibrant desert-inspired color and high contrast materials, suggestive of strong daylight and crisp shadows; curvilinear bistro chairs and live succulents & cactus offer visual relief to the interior’s stark angularity. The interior features commissioned artwork by several Texas based artists and a custom fabricated lighting installation evocative of the region’s sprawling multi-branched cactus. The fast-track project was completed in collaboration with Joel Mozersky Design.

Project Data
Client: Private
Project Size: 1,600 square feet
Construction Cost: Private
Services: Interior Architecture
Completed: 2015
Credits: Photos courtesy of Javelina

 

West Village Artist Loft

west-village-artist-loft

Located within a Landmarked adaptively reused industrial complex, the duplex artists’ loft renovation is conceived to accommodate two artists’ professional needs, tastes and ‘empty-nest’ lives while celebrating the building’s industrial heritage.

The entry level, appointed in American folk art and antiques, includes the couple’s bedroom and a studio/office. The loft’s main level contains both digital media and drawing studios, an expanded living area and new custom kitchen. The axial view from the building’s interior courtyard, northward to an expansive Manhattan view organizes the planning while white furnishings, custom lacquered millwork and European oak flooring serve as counterpoint to an extensive collection of Aboriginal artifacts and modernist artwork.

Project Data
Client: Private
Project Size: 1,200 square feet
Construction Cost: Private
Services: Interior Architecture
Completed: 2015

Midtown Architecture Studio

midtown-architecture-studio

The design of this commercial interior architecture studio is based on a Modernist sensibility executed within a restrained materials & color palette. The former industrial space is conceived as an open-office that engages the neighboring urban landscape of rooftop structures. The design maximizes daylight and views to the city along its three exposures, inviting a dynamic interplay between the reflectivity of glass surfaces and the transparency between discrete spaces. A modular Knoll furniture system provides uniformity & flexibility between workstations at all staff levels, while automated shading modulates solar patterns and controls associated heat-gain. The fast-track project – design, approvals & construction in 12 weeks – including new HVAC systems, lighting, furniture & finishes was completed for less than $100/sf.

Hudson Clearwater Restaurant

hudson-clearwater

Opened in December 2010, this neighborhood hotspot quickly earned international recognition for both its culinary excellence and distinguished design as the “hidden-gem” of the West Village. The intention from the beginning was to create a restaurant that felt like a home; where the experience of coming to dine would feel like going to a private dinner at a friend’s charmingly restored historic manor. The extensive build-out process involved structurally stabilizing the 1826 historic-landmarked Greenwich Village carriage house and stripping away layers of architectural abuse to reveal the beauty of the historic bones beneath, thereby converting the space from a former insurance office and trash dump to a quintessential local restaurant favorite.

Large portions of the rear facade were demolished allowing for the installation of expansive french casement windows and doors, opening the restaurant interiors to lush garden plantings and cobbled brick pavers which replaced the former concrete trash slab. The cellar was excavated and floors reframed to create a multi-level dining space with new entry stairs from the rear garden and down to private wine cellar dining below. The original wood floors and beams were salvaged and repurposed to create a large wooden chef’s counter at the open kitchen, sliding wooden barn doors, and decorative trim throughout the interiors. In addition to recycling many of the materials found on site, wood was salvaged from local demolition projects, and low VOC environmentally-friendly paints and sealers were utilized throughout. Double-insulated windows and energy-efficient lighting, exhaust, heating, air conditioning and hot water systems were implemented in-keeping with the sustainable and socially-conscious mission of the restaurant.

Project Data
Client: Village Restaurant Group LLC
Project Size: 1,200 square feet
Construction Cost: Private
Services: Full Architectural Services
Completed: 2010

Earth Institure Center for Environmental Sustainability | Columbia University

earth-institute-center-for-environmental-sustainability

The Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability – EICES (formerly the Center for Environmental Research & Conservation – CERC) on the campus of Columbia University, is a consortium of Columbia University, the American Museum of Natural History, The New York Botanical Garden, the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Wildlife Preservation Trust International.

This interdisciplinary education and research facility incorporates offices, laboratories, a library and rooftop research greenhouses. The design uses materials of low environmental impact and maximizes the use of daylight throughout the center. The three-level, 18,000 sf, $1.8 million project was featured on the cover of Interior Design magazine.

“In developing [EICES], we have blended a strong environmental theme with a new way of using academic space.” -Don Melnick, Executive Director

Project Data
Project Size: 18,000 square feet
Construction Cost: $1,800,000
Services: Full Architectural Services
Completed: 1997
Credits: Consulting Architects: BNK Architects; Photography: Paul Warchol

Clinton Hill Loft

clinton-hill-loft

Located within an adaptively reused garment factory, this loft renovation with expansive west facing views to downtown Brooklyn and Lower Manhattan, provides a minimal, neutral backdrop to a collection of mid-20th century artwork and east Indian antiques. Custom white-lacquered millwork contrasts with ebonized wood flooring, while a subdued palette of low-profile modern furnishings is juxtaposed against the building’s concrete structural elements.

 

Project Data
Client: Private
Project Size: 1,000 square feet
Construction Cost: Private
Services: Interior Architecture
Completed: 2015

Canal Street Commercial Offices

canal-street-commercial-offices

202 Canal is a $4 million, 47,600 square foot 9-story office and retail building in the heart of New York’s Chinatown. Elemental was charged with repositioning the existing building into a new 29-unit Class ‘A’ commercial condominium. The work included the modernization, interior replanning & condominium subdivision of the entire building, as well as the design of the building lobby, model unit & sales office and all common spaces and amenities. Additionally, elemental coordinated the various architectural agency filings between the NYS Office of the Attorney General, NYC Department of Buildings and NYC Department of Finance as well as supporting marketing andsales team efforts.

Project Data
Client: Keystone Equities
Project Size: 47,600 square feet
Construction Cost: Private
Services: Interior Architecture
Completed: 2015