Clinton Hill Loft

clinton-hill-loft

Located within an adaptively reused garment factory, this loft renovation with expansive west facing views to downtown Brooklyn and Lower Manhattan, provides a minimal, neutral backdrop to a collection of mid-20th century artwork and east Indian antiques. Custom white-lacquered millwork contrasts with ebonized wood flooring, while a subdued palette of low-profile modern furnishings is juxtaposed against the building’s concrete structural elements.

 

Project Data
Client: Private
Project Size: 1,000 square feet
Construction Cost: Private
Services: Interior Architecture
Completed: 2015

Canal Street Commercial Offices

canal-street-commercial-offices

202 Canal is a $4 million, 47,600 square foot 9-story office and retail building in the heart of New York’s Chinatown. Elemental was charged with repositioning the existing building into a new 29-unit Class ‘A’ commercial condominium. The work included the modernization, interior replanning & condominium subdivision of the entire building, as well as the design of the building lobby, model unit & sales office and all common spaces and amenities. Additionally, elemental coordinated the various architectural agency filings between the NYS Office of the Attorney General, NYC Department of Buildings and NYC Department of Finance as well as supporting marketing andsales team efforts.

Project Data
Client: Keystone Equities
Project Size: 47,600 square feet
Construction Cost: Private
Services: Interior Architecture
Completed: 2015

Javelina Restaurant

javelina-restaurant

This 1,600 sf restaurant interior draws inspiration from the fusion of traditional Mexican design elements, such as encaustic tile and geometric patterning, with qualities of the sparse & arid landscape of southwest Texas. A neutral, earth-toned palette of natural materials is punctuated by the application of vibrant desert-inspired color and high contrast materials, suggestive of strong daylight and crisp shadows; curvilinear bistro chairs and live succulents & cactus offer visual relief to the interior’s stark angularity. The interior features commissioned artwork by several Texas based artists and a custom fabricated lighting installation evocative of the region’s sprawling multi-branched cactus. The fast-track project was completed in collaboration with Joel Mozersky Design.

Project Data
Client: Private
Project Size: 1,600 square feet
Construction Cost: Private
Services: Interior Architecture
Completed: 2015
Credits: Photos courtesy of Javelina

 

West Village Artist Loft

west-village-artist-loft

Located within a Landmarked adaptively reused industrial complex, the duplex artists’ loft renovation is conceived to accommodate two artists’ professional needs, tastes and ‘empty-nest’ lives while celebrating the building’s industrial heritage.

The entry level, appointed in American folk art and antiques, includes the couple’s bedroom and a studio/office. The loft’s main level contains both digital media and drawing studios, an expanded living area and new custom kitchen. The axial view from the building’s interior courtyard, northward to an expansive Manhattan view organizes the planning while white furnishings, custom lacquered millwork and European oak flooring serve as counterpoint to an extensive collection of Aboriginal artifacts and modernist artwork.

Project Data
Client: Private
Project Size: 1,200 square feet
Construction Cost: Private
Services: Interior Architecture
Completed: 2015

Midtown Architecture Studio

midtown-architecture-studio

The design of this commercial interior architecture studio is based on a Modernist sensibility executed within a restrained materials & color palette. The former industrial space is conceived as an open-office that engages the neighboring urban landscape of rooftop structures. The design maximizes daylight and views to the city along its three exposures, inviting a dynamic interplay between the reflectivity of glass surfaces and the transparency between discrete spaces. A modular Knoll furniture system provides uniformity & flexibility between workstations at all staff levels, while automated shading modulates solar patterns and controls associated heat-gain. The fast-track project – design, approvals & construction in 12 weeks – including new HVAC systems, lighting, furniture & finishes was completed for less than $100/sf.

Williamsburg Townhouse

williamsburg-townhouse

Located on a small lot along bustling Metropolitan Avenue in the heart of Brooklyn’s hip Williamsburg neighborhood, this elegantly compact two-family townhouse was designed to maximize efficient use of space with clean, simple and bright interiors sheltered behind a curtain of dark pre-patinated zinc. The triplex over duplex configuration inspired by the traditional West Village townhouse plan affords separate private street entrances for each family, while the materials chosen were heavily influenced by Brooklyn’s industrial history.

The standing seam pleated front facade offering privacy and acoustic separation from the street noise below splays outward over the sidewalk to reveal full height glass windows giving the bedrooms and living room views of the Manhattan skyline beyond. By contrast, the south facade enjoys an array of oversized glass windows and juliette balconies flooding the interiors with natural daylight and overlooking the terraced rear garden and patio below. Interior open stairs slice delicately through the middle of each floor, navigating past the sprawling open kitchen, between the upper bedrooms, and beyond the master suite to a rooftop deck and jacuzzi with Manhattan views.

Project Data
Client: Private
Project Size: 3,068 square feet
Construction Cost: Private
Services: Full Architectural Design
Completed Design: 2013

Hudson Clearwater Restaurant

hudson-clearwater

Opened in December 2010, this neighborhood hotspot quickly earned international recognition for both its culinary excellence and distinguished design as the “hidden-gem” of the West Village. The intention from the beginning was to create a restaurant that felt like a home; where the experience of coming to dine would feel like going to a private dinner at a friend’s charmingly restored historic manor. The extensive build-out process involved structurally stabilizing the 1826 historic-landmarked Greenwich Village carriage house and stripping away layers of architectural abuse to reveal the beauty of the historic bones beneath, thereby converting the space from a former insurance office and trash dump to a quintessential local restaurant favorite.

Large portions of the rear facade were demolished allowing for the installation of expansive french casement windows and doors, opening the restaurant interiors to lush garden plantings and cobbled brick pavers which replaced the former concrete trash slab. The cellar was excavated and floors reframed to create a multi-level dining space with new entry stairs from the rear garden and down to private wine cellar dining below. The original wood floors and beams were salvaged and repurposed to create a large wooden chef’s counter at the open kitchen, sliding wooden barn doors, and decorative trim throughout the interiors. In addition to recycling many of the materials found on site, wood was salvaged from local demolition projects, and low VOC environmentally-friendly paints and sealers were utilized throughout. Double-insulated windows and energy-efficient lighting, exhaust, heating, air conditioning and hot water systems were implemented in-keeping with the sustainable and socially-conscious mission of the restaurant.

Project Data
Client: Village Restaurant Group LLC
Project Size: 1,200 square feet
Construction Cost: Private
Services: Full Architectural Services
Completed: 2010

Upper Manhattan Residential Tower

west-163rd-street-mixed-use-condominium

Located in the Audubon Terrace neighborhood of upper Manhattan, New York City, this building contains an outpatient medical facility as well as a neighborhood arts-oriented community organization within its base. Separating the community facilities, a ‘sky-garden’ provides both open and covered outdoor spaces and amenities. A 12-storey residential tower rises above, providing unobstructed vistas to the Hudson & Harlem Rivers, the Palisades of New Jersey and the skyline of midtown Manhattan.

The building employs numerous sustainable and energy-conscious strategies and helps renew a vibrant, culturally rich neighborhood.

Project Data
Client: Private
Project Size: 62,000 square feet
Construction Cost: $15,500,000
Services: Full Architectural Services
Completed: Project Suspended

Hudson River Residence

hudson-river-residence

Sited along the Hudson River adjacent to the Old Albany Post Road, this compact residence  consists of four distinct zones each of which can be operated independently. The main block consists of three levels while the triangular “pavilion”, with its expansive Hudson River views, is a single story supported on a storage room volume. The main block and pavilion can function as a continuous space to accommodate larger gatherings. However, except when actually in use, the pavilion is unconditioned, working either as a buffer or a direct-gain solar collector. Sustainable features include high-efficiency zoned radiant heating coupled with direct solar gain and minimal construction waste.

Project Data
Client: Private
Project Size: 2,100 square feet
Construction Cost: Private
Services: Full Architectural Services
Completed: 2007

Department of Environmental Conservation Regional Headquarters

department-of-environmental-conservation-regional-headquarters

This new high performance building will provide a regional administrative hub for the state agency charged with protecting and regulating environmental issues. The building is the DEC’s first designed under NYS Executive Order 111 and is projected to achieve a LEED “Gold” rating. The building makes extensive use of daylighting and direct solar gain with automated shading integrated with lighting controls. Materials are renewable, locally produced and make extensive use of recycled content. A pressurized raised floor and modular partition system accommodate future program changes with flexible power, data and HVAC distribution while eliminating most ductwork. DOE2 computer modeling indicates that the building will have energy savings of at least 42 percent when compared to a code-compliant or LEED baseline building.

Project Data
Client: NYS Department of Conservation Regional Headquarters
Project Size: 30,000 square feet
Construction Cost: $9,500,000
Services: Full Architectural Services
Complete: Project Suspended

South Jamaica Branch Library

south-jamaica-branch-library

The first building designed and constructed under the NYC High Performance Building Guidelines, this 14,000 SF $3.1 million project includes rooftop light-monitors which provide indirect daylighting with automated shading and lighting controls, integrated direct solar gain and gravity exhaust systems. The project received the Committee for the Environment Top Ten Award from the national AIA and has been featured by numerous publications as among New York City’s first “green” buildings.

Research, design and construction documents were by The Stein Partnership and construction administration was by Stein White Architects, predecessor firms to Elemental Architecture. Carl Stein, FAIA was principal-in-charge throughout.

Project Data
Client: New York City Department of Design & Construction + Queens Borough Public Library
Project Size: 14,000 square feet
Construction Cost: $3,100,000
Services: Full Architectural Services
Completed: 1999

Great Hall at City College of New York

great-hall-city-college-of-new-york

The $12.8 million restoration of the 14,000 sf Great Hall was made necessary by deteriorated structural elements, a severely inadequate mechanical system and crumbling floors. The scope of work allowed the introduction of modern, state of the art acoustic and lighting systems which make the grand assembly space available for a wide variety of programs ranging from lectures and musical performances to commercial film and television shoots. The work also included the refurbishment of twelve sixty-foot stained glass windows, extensive repair of the elaborate decorative plaster and woodwork, and newly designed limestone floor and new control booth. The restoration received the Lucy G. Moses Award from the New York Landmarks Conservancy.

Project Data
Client: The Dormitory Authority of the State of New York + City University of New York
Project Size: 14,000 square feet
Construction Cost: $12,800,000
Services: Full Architectural Services
Completed: 1997

Earth Institure Center for Environmental Sustainability | Columbia University

earth-institute-center-for-environmental-sustainability

The Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability – EICES (formerly the Center for Environmental Research & Conservation – CERC) on the campus of Columbia University, is a consortium of Columbia University, the American Museum of Natural History, The New York Botanical Garden, the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Wildlife Preservation Trust International.

This interdisciplinary education and research facility incorporates offices, laboratories, a library and rooftop research greenhouses. The design uses materials of low environmental impact and maximizes the use of daylight throughout the center. The three-level, 18,000 sf, $1.8 million project was featured on the cover of Interior Design magazine.

“In developing [EICES], we have blended a strong environmental theme with a new way of using academic space.” -Don Melnick, Executive Director

Project Data
Project Size: 18,000 square feet
Construction Cost: $1,800,000
Services: Full Architectural Services
Completed: 1997
Credits: Consulting Architects: BNK Architects; Photography: Paul Warchol

Walt Whitman Historic Birthplace Visitor's Center

walt-whitman-historic-center

The cross section of the Walt Whitman Birthplace State Historic Site and Interpretive Center serves as a gateway to the site surrounding the house where Walt Whitman was born. The facility admits controlled daylight and segregates hot air for exhaust during swing seasons, minimizing the need for air conditioning. The use of exposed structure dramatically reduced the need for applied architectural finishes while establishing a vocabulary that is sympathetic to the early nineteenth century birthplace house. Exhibits on the wall form a reverse time line, beginning with the mature Whitman who is most familiar and leads back through his formative years to his birth point.

Project Data
Client: Walt Whitman Historic Birthplace
Construction Cost: $520,000
Services: Full Architectural Services
Completed: 1996

Shanghai Commercial & Residential Towers

shanghai-commercial-residential-towers

This project consists of two underground parking levels and a three story commercial base, with a shopping mall and food market components, supporting a 30-story office building and a 26-story residential tower. The 900,000 sf, complex utilizes black and gray water systems and on-site pre-treatment of all waste.

The project was designed in collaboration with Tician Papachristou FAIA

Women’s Rights National Historic Park & Visitor's Center

womens-rights-national-historic-park-visitors-center

A collaboration between design competition winners Ray Kinoshita and Ann Marshall, this $8.5 million project uses site elements and building fragments to create a place of contemplation and reflection. The project was developed to create a gateway into the town of Seneca Falls, NY. The plan and the materials weave the site into the urban fabric while also marking the Wesleyan Chapel site as an important historic monument.
The Women’s Rights National Historic Park has been honored with a National Endowment for the Arts Federal Design Achievement Award as well as local and state awards.

Project Data
Client: National Park Service
Construction Cost: $8,500,000
Services: Full Architectural Services
Completed: 1993

Combined FDNY & NYPD Facility

combined-fdny-nypd-facility

Serving both the New York City Police and Fire Departments, the Combined Police and Fire Facility is a new building which incorporates two Landmarked 19th-century facades. The original fire headquarters required the replacement of all brownstone ornament with new cast stone. Sustainable features include the adaptive reuse of landmark facades and HVAC systems using scheduling controls and occupancy sensors. The project has received several awards including the Lucy G. Moses Award from the New York Landmarks Conservancy and New York City Art Commission.

Project Data
Client: The City of New York Department of Design & Construction + NYPD + FDNY
Construction Cost: $18,000,000
Services: Full Architectural Services
Completed: 1991

FDNY Rescue Company 1

fdny-rescue-company-1

The headquarters for Rescue Co. 1 is home to the first fire rescue company in the United States. The project was executed within a highly compressed schedule following the destruction of the original headquarters when an adjacent building collapsed. The new headquarters includes salvaged and reinstalled stone and ironwork from the original Napoleon LeBrun facade. The design includes several specific features developed in conjunction with Rescue 1 including open showers and drains on the apparatus floor and overhead suspension of various pieces of large rescue equipment including their water rescue Zodiac boat.

Recognizing that the 25’ wide, three-storey building would be dwarfed by its neighbors, the deep articulated street facade with its central “1” cared into its cornice, was designed to provide a significant architectural presence for this important, historic civic institution.

Project Data
Client:The City of New York Department of Design & Construction + FDNY
Construction Cost: $3,200,000
Services: Full Architectural Services
Completed: 1988

Martha's Vineyard Cottage

marthas-vineyard-cottage

The 800 square foot, three bedroom summer house is sited in former farmland – a field surrounded by stone walls. Two twenty-foot squares, one with bedrooms and a bath and the other living/dining/kitchen and a half bath, straddle a third square, a half-roofed screened deck. A sliding panel opens one end of the living room square to the field while a second opens the other side to the screened deck creating a 20 by 40 foot pavilion.

The plan of the house is based on a 48 inch module, marked by the exposed studs and joists. It provides basic shelter from the elements in a spatially sophisticated structure that offers a maximum sense of connection to the surrounding environment.

 

Westbeth Center for the Arts

westbeth-center-for-the-arts

The Westbeth Center for the Arts is the largest affordable housing community dedicated to artists in the world. With nearly 400 residences, the community is among the first examples of adaptive reuse of an industrial building into residential use. The NYC Landmark complex, occupying an entire city block, was originally the site of the Bell Laboratories and converted to artists’ housing by Richard Meier in 1970.

Elemental, serving as both the Building Architect and Owner’s Representative, has completed or overseen projects at various scales within the complex ranging from the development of a historic window replacement campaign and Local Law 11 restoration, analyses for energy efficient upgrades of the physical plant, ADA modifications and tenant-related renovations up through large-scale commercial tenant and zoning feasibility studies. Following Super Storm Sandy, Elemental has assisted in implementing various resiliency measures and redesigning new artists’ studios & facilities that had been damaged or destroyed.

Shepard Hall Reconstruction at CCNY

shepard-hall-reconstruction-city-college-of-new-york

As the largest project of its kind anywhere in the world, this $150 million dollar reconstruction of a 400,000 SF historic landmark is now in its final phase of completion. Shepard Hall opened in 1907 as the first building built for public higher education in New York. The reconstruction work has been performed for the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York (DASNY) acting as agent for the City University of New York (CUNY). Exterior work included rebuilding the entire building shell including replacement of approximately 72,000 different pieces of ornamental terra cotta with new durable thin-shell GFRC. Interior work included restoration of the 14,000 square foot Great Hall, ornate meeting rooms and interior stairs. The project has also restored the five major building entrances.

Research, design and construction was begun by The Stein Partnership in 1986. Between 1997 and 2006 Construction Document reorganization and Construction Administration shifted to Stein White Architects and Stein White Nelligan Architects; and since 2006, all work, including the design of the entry restorations, has been by Elemental Architecture. Throughout the project, Carl Stein has been principal-in-charge.

This building, now restored to its place as the centerpiece of the City University of New York’s main campus, has received wide recognition including the New York Landmarks Conservancy Lucy G. Moses Award and has been written about extensively. In 2011, the project was the subject of the keynote address at the international GFRC Congress in Istanbul, Turkey.

Project Data
Client: The Dormitory Authority of the State of New York + City University of New York
Project Size: 400,000 square feet
Construction Cost: $150,000,000 (all phases)
Services: Full Architectural Services
Completed: Ongoing